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150 Refugees Finally Given Dental Work – For Free

150 Refugees Finally Given Dental Work – For Free

150 Refugees Finally Given Dental Work – For FreeOver 150 Syrian refugees who have settled in Canada have just been given their first dental consultation since emigrating from overseas – and it was 100% free of charge.

Roughly 30 different Montreal dentists and hygienists in Ville Saint-Laurent offered up their services this weekend to all of the Syrians who have been unable to afford a dental check-up since their arrival to the country.

In addition to the weekend’s dental work, any refugees who require a follow-up visit will not be charged when they return.

The session was spearheaded by Syrian orthodontist Dr. Ayan Chamma in collaboration with the Red Cross and volunteers from John Abbott College. Dr. Ayan instigated the event as a means of helping his native people who have struggled in adjusting to Canadian citizenship since their emigration.

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Erasing Hate: He Found His Purpose by Wiping Out Hateful Graffiti in His City

Erasing Hate: He Found His Purpose by Wiping Out Hateful Graffiti in His City

This Canadian has dedicated his life to cleaning up hateful and racist graffiti anywhere it pops up in his city—and now “Erasing Hate” has become a movement.

Corey Fleischer first experience the joy of combatting the awful drawings two years ago when he drove past a van that had “KKK” and swastikas spray-painted on the side.

After talking with the owner of the vehicle, Corey got to work cleaning up the vandalism. When he was finished, he says he felt a sense of euphoria.

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Selfless Giving: How to Do it and Why We Need it

Selfless Giving: How to Do it and Why We Need it

Selfless Giving: How to Do it and Why We Need itIn this digital, socially-networked age, giving has become remarkably easy and convenient. Just click, and we’ve made a contribution we can feel good about.

There are plenty of other easy (and fun) ways to feel good about giving, too – from participating in raffles and golf tournaments to running a 5K or selling bracelets made by women in developing countries. Thanks to this, the spirit of giving and giving back has become an integral part of life here in the U.S. and in other lucky parts of the world. In fact, “giving” and “giving back” are now buzzwords we toss around regularly.

It’s uplifting that so many of us are on board to give. Yet, could the sheer simplicity of the process potentially create a chasm of oblivion between our generosity and the reasons why giving is necessary in the first place? After all, the world we live in is steeped in tragic poverty. Buying a raffle ticket might ultimately contribute to the cause, but does it move those of us who purchased it any closer to understanding the discomfort of those we seek to help?

Understanding is an important part of actually making the world a better place. For only through understanding discomfort, by experiencing it ourselves, can we fully engage in the process of fomenting change. Fully engaging makes all the difference between truly giving and merely going through the motions.

Enter selfless giving. This conscious, intentional approach to giving allows us to do things for others and our community that not only help and make a contribution, but also force us to push the boundaries of our comfort zone – thus experiencing a twinge of discomfort ourselves.

For example, in donating clothing, many of us are likely to sort through our closets and pick from a pile of old, discarded, worn-out garments that have no meaning to us anymore. Giving these garments away requires as little thought and as little emotion as dumping them in the trash. So have we truly been intentional and engaged in the process, or was it simply a convenience to our self?

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Congregation ‘Miraculously’ Unharmed After Tornado Destroys Church Around Them

Congregation ‘Miraculously’ Unharmed After Tornado Destroys Church Around Them

Congregation ‘Miraculously’ Unharmed After Tornado Destroys Church Around ThemThis congregation was attending a service at their church on Saturday night when they were told terrifying news: a tornado was headed right in their direction.

Roughly 45 attendees – children and adults alike – were at the parish hall of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church near Dallas, Texas when they were warned of the impending danger.

The parishioners crowded into the hallway connecting their parish hall and the main church. 30 seconds later, the tornado tore the outside of the building to pieces.

Everyone made sure to keep each other safe as they stayed low to the ground, praying all the while. Others struggled to keep the hallway doors shut against the wind.

“We could see the beams bending and the aluminum roof being ripped away,” one of the youth pastors told CNN. “As soon as the worst was over, we began to sing to keep the kids calm.”

The chaos eventually subsided, leaving heaps of brick and rubble in its wake. The congregation, however, was miraculously unharmed.

St. John’s was the only church in the town of Emory, Texas with a population of roughly 1,200 people. One of the men who was due to deliver a speech to the parishioners that night started a GoFundMe page to help fund the reconstruction of the church. The page has already raised $1,200 of its $5,000 goal.

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Crowd Hangs On to Suicidal Man For 2 Hours Until Help Arrives

Crowd Hangs On to Suicidal Man For 2 Hours Until Help Arrives

Crowd Hangs On to Suicidal Man For 2 Hours Until Help ArrivesDespite it taking two hours for proper help to arrive, these members of the public refused to let go of a suicidal man preparing to jump off of a bridge.

Last week during rush hour near Golders Green, North London, the man climbed over a bridge railing so he could leap to his death.
Passerby immediately rushed to grab him through the bars so he wouldn’t be able to jump.

As police arrived to offer assistance, the man was also tied to the railing with rope.

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Facebook Provides Valuable Safety Net for the Bereaved, Study Finds

Facebook Provides Valuable Safety Net for the Bereaved, Study Finds

Facebook Provides Valuable Safety Net for the Bereaved, Study FindsNeuroscientists have long noted that if certain brain cells are destroyed by, say, a stroke, new circuits may be laid in another location to compensate, essentially rewiring the brain.

One expert in computational social science, wanted to know if social networks responded similarly after the death of a close mutual friend.

In new research published on Monday, Northeastern’s William R. Hobbs found that friends on Facebook did provide new avenues of communication, pointing to a strength of social networks—providing resilience.

Hobbs, who led the study, collaborated with Facebook data scientist Moira Burke. The researchers found that close friends of the deceased immediately increased their interactions with one another by 30 percent, peaking in volume.

The interactions faded a bit in the following months and ultimately stabilized at the same volume of interaction as before, but this insight into how social networks adapt to significant losses could lead to new ways to help people with the grieving process.

“Most people don’t have very many friends, so when we lose one, that leaves a hole in our networks as well as in our lives,” says Hobbs, a Professor of Political Science and Computer and Information Science.

He then wondered: Would a social network unravel with a central member gone? If it recovered, how might it heal?

“We expected to see a spike in interactions among close friends immediately after the loss, corresponding with the acute grieving period,” says Hobbs. “What surprised us was that the stronger ties continued for years. People made up for the loss of interacting with the friend who had died by increasing interactions with one another.”

Hobbs came to the study from a crisis of his own. After college, he lived and worked in China studying local governments. But when he entered graduate school at the University of California, San Diego, his father was dying. “So I switched to American politics, then to studying chronic illnesses, and then moving into the effect of deaths on others,” he says.

That switch led to this first large-scale investigation of recovery and resilience after a death in social networks.

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Trust in Community Leads to Better Long-term Decisions Among the Poor

Trust in Community Leads to Better Long-term Decisions Among the Poor

Trust in Community Leads to Better Long-term Decisions Among the PoorNo man is an island – no matter how much money you have.

This new study from Princeton University finds that low-income individuals who trust their communities make better long-term financial decisions. This is likely because citizens rely on friends and neighbors for financial support, rather than quick fixes, like payday loans, which further digs them into debt.

The findings show the importance of building strong communities, especially for low-income individuals. The researchers suggest moving away from a focus on the individuals themselves, and instead focusing on low-income communities through targeted policies.

“Instead of cutting funding to community development programs, policymakers should implement changes that give individuals in low-income communities more opportunities to develop community trust,” said study co-author Elke Weber, professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.

To determine why low-income individuals tend to make more myopic (or short-term) financial decisions, the researchers conducted a series of studies, focusing on both the United States and Bangladesh.

In the first study, the researchers invited 647 participants from the United States to make several choices between “smaller, sooner” and “larger, later” options, taking into account participants’ incomes and how much they trusted their local communities. They found that richer participants were generally less likely to make harmful short-term decisions than those with lower incomes, but that this only applied to low-income individuals who did not trust their communities. In contrast, those low-income individuals who trust their communities more made financial decisions that were very similar to those made by richer participants.

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Pope Opens Free Laundromat for Rome’s Poor

Pope Opens Free Laundromat for Rome’s Poor

Pope Opens Free Laundromat for Rome’s PoorPope Francis has just opened an establishment for the homeless population of Rome so they can do their laundry for free.

“Pope Francis’ Laundry” opened its doors to the public on Monday. Six washing machines, dryers, and clothing irons were donated by Michigan-based appliance company Whirlpool, while the detergent and cleaners are being provided by Proctor and Gamble.

Located in the Trastevere neighborhood near the Vatican, officials say that they soon hope to also install showers and a barbershop within the facilities, making it a haven of free, valuable services to the poor people of Rome.

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Artist’s Stunning Photos Shatter Misconceptions About Disabilities

Artist’s Stunning Photos Shatter Misconceptions About Disabilities

“People make assumptions based on the way people look and act and do not always see the person behind the condition.”

Paige is a 19-year-old on the autism spectrum with ADHD and vasovagal syncope, which causes fainting.

Paige is a 19-year-old on the autism spectrum with ADHD and vasovagal syncope, which causes fainting.

Ceridwen Hughes, a photographer from North Wales, wants the world to view disabilities differently.

In an effort to change people’s perspectives, he created a photo project called “We Can…” that focuses on what people with disabilities can do, rather than what they cannot.

“People make assumptions based on the way people look and act and do not always see the person behind the condition,” Hughes told The Huffington Post.

The photographer visited Coleg Cambria, a school in Northop, North Wales, that has a program teaching independent living skills to people with disabilities. He spoke to students while taking their portraits.

“Just because a person has a disability does not mean that they do not have dreams and hopes for the future,” Hughes said. “Many people with disabilities want to work and be valuable members of the community, and often they just need that opportunity.”

Hughes’ striking photos are accompanied by honest interviews with his subjects about what they wish other people understood about their condition. The images highlight the unique abilities of those with disabilities; in the United States, that’s approximately one in five people.

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Substitute Bus Driver Takes Day to Build Ramp For Disabled Girl He Didn’t Know

Fill-in school bus driver builds ramp for disabled girlFill-in school bus driver builds ramp for disabled girl

Thomas Mitchell couldn’t stand to see Lydia struggle with her aluminum ramp every morning – so he built her a new one instead.

Tom is a mechanic working in Clarksville, Tennessee who is sometimes employed to be a substitute driver on the school buses he fixes.

One of the children who he picks up on is route is a young girl in a wheelchair named Lydia Despain. Lydia’s mother Verna says that because her daughter suffers from a seizure disorder, she has developed differently than other children.

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